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Long-Term Care

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Hiring Private Duty Home Care Workers:
Why Work through an Agency?
By Rona S. Bartelstone, LCSW, BCD, CMC
 
(Page 1 of 4)

One of the greatest long-term needs of older adults and those with chronic illnesses is for in-home, custodial care services. These workers are often referred to as home health aides, certified nursing assistants and custodial care workers. These in-home workers make it possible for people with functional limitations to remain at home in a comfortable, familiar environment. Home health aides (as we will refer to this class of workers) provide a wide range of assistance with activities of daily living (ADLs), such as bathing, dressing, grooming, assisting with ambulation or transferring, toileting, feeding and providing medication reminders. In addition, home health aides help with what professionals call, instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs), such as shopping, meal preparation, making medical appointments, transportation, laundry and companionship. 

While it is true that most people would prefer to remain in their own homes, there are circumstances in which care in a residential or nursing facility is more appropriate and more cost-effective. For example, the individual who needs round the clock care because of treatments or behavioral issues will find a nursing facility or residential setting likely to be more affordable. The biggest proportion of people who utilize home health aide services are those who need several hours per day of assistance, as opposed to those who need full-time care.

Due to the cost and the increasing shortage of home health aides, many families seeking to hire in-home staff turn to private individuals rather than working through an agency. While at first glance this seems reasonable, it can also cause numerous problems and create unexpected liabilities for the family, who becomes the employer.

Tax Issues
As a private employer, the individual or family is required to pay Social Security, unemployment and payroll taxes. Many home health aides will represent themselves as independent contractors, ostensibly relieving the hiring individual of these tax obligations. However, it is the responsibility of the hiring individual to be sure that the aide truly is an independent contractor and is therefore paying their own taxes. In many instances, the aide will not meet the legal criteria as an independent contractor. If the aide has not met his or her tax obligations, this responsibility falls to the employer. This can be a serious obligation because it may involve interest on back taxes, civil fines and the possibility of criminal penalties. Potential private employers should seek the advice of a labor lawyer to assure appropriate hiring practices with respect to federal tax laws.

Case Example: Mr. L hired a home health aide for his mother on the basis of a recommendation from a neighbor who also employed this individual. Mrs. L needed help because of a minor stroke that left her unsteady on her feet. Initially, Mrs. L only needed four hours of help per day to assure that she had a bath, that two meals were prepared and that the weekly shopping was completed. Occasionally, the aide also accompanied Mrs. L to some of her many medical appointments.

 

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