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Dementia

I believe that my parents, who have different stages of Alzheimer's, should be allowed to  "participate" in anything that involves their care as well as any and all family conferences in their regard. Unfortunately, more

Jan 12, 2018 11:09 AM Carenotes 2 Comments

My mother is in a rapid decline with dementia, as well as other health issues. She is unable to be alone for any time period. more

Dec 21, 2017 10:52 AM Carenotes 2 Comments

A hedge row stitches suede sky to prairie patches. I brake for a weathered truck and read the “eat beef” bumper sticker. My pulse slows as Public Radio plays Jesu, Joy of Man’s Desiring. more

CareVerses

The Spectrum of Hope offers practical advice, wisdom, and real hope. Here are chapters on how to maintain independence and dignity; how to fight depression, anxiety, and apathy; how to communicate effectively with a person suffering from dementia. more

Dec 13, 2017 2:09 PM Book Club

Confusion spreads, his people change, his world is suddenly very strange. He fights against it, holds it tight, surrounds himself with those, who make his world bright. more

CareVerses

I read him poetry, and he cries. He’s eighty two and has Alzheimer’s more

CareVerses

One of the most anxiety-causing side effects of dementia is wandering. Nearly 60 percent of all people with dementia wander, especially in the middle stages. more

Dec 5, 2017 1:33 PM Articles

That’s my dad with his beautiful snow-white curls framed by the lake. He still knows me, but the last stroke left him in a wheelchair, in an adult family home, and with dementia. His love of 65 years has been gone for almost two years now. more

Dec 1, 2017 10:31 AM Articles

What is the best and most effective way of dealing with questions and concerns asked repeatedly and constantly.  Tips to learn patience in listening and repeatedly answering same question. more

Nov 17, 2017 3:37 PM Carenotes 1 Comments

“Am I 90 Yet? Mom asked. I heard those Unknown Objectwords many times the last year of mother’s life. My mother’s memory was fading. Nevertheless, she was still sharp in certain areas, for example; more

Nov 17, 2017 3:36 PM Articles 2 Comments

Becoming a caregiver for someone with Alzheimer’s disease can be an underappreciated, and yet noble role. Because of the nature of these disorders, the only way to become an effective caregiver is to become well-informed about the disease. more

Nov 9, 2017 6:26 AM Book Club

Are you caregiving for a loved one with dementia? Does your loved one share a residence with you? If you answered yes to both of these questions, you most likely worry about your loved one’s safety, especially when he or she is alone at home. more

Nov 3, 2017 2:42 PM Articles

You see an old man Drooling in his wheelchair. I see a man who could make almost anything With scrap metal from the junk pile. more

CareVerses

A: Accept that some of the hardest decisions you will ever have to make lie ahead. For example, when does nursing home care become the best or, perhaps, the only option? more

Oct 18, 2017 9:54 AM Articles

I care for my husband who is in an advanced stage of Alzheimer's.  I love my husband dearly but he no longer knows me nor can we have the wonderful conversations we used to have.  It gets very very lonely. more

Sep 25, 2017 12:00 AM Carenotes 1 Comments

After eight years of taking care of both parents by herself, Mary had a stroke. The stroke affected her mobility and leg strength, but most importantly to Mary, it meant her caregiving days were over. more

Aug 25, 2017 12:44 PM Editor's Pen

Caregivers who are just beginning their journey may feel adult day care services are for later stages of their loved one’s situation. The sooner caregivers locate and enroll their family member in a program more

Articles

Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) refers to a group of disorders caused by progressive nerve cell loss in the brain's frontal lobes. more

Aug 18, 2017 2:50 PM Articles

Dementia itself is not a disease, but rather a set of symptoms that accompany specific diseases. more

Articles

At some point, people with Alzheimer’s disease will need help with bathing, grooming, and dressing. more

Articles