Caregiver.com

For About and By Caregivers


Subscribe to our bi-monthly publication Today's Caregiver magazine

  + Larger Font | - Smaller Font



ARTICLES / General /Careful in the Kitchen / Other Articles

Share This Article

Careful in the Kitchen

By Jennifer Bradley, Staff Writer

(Page 3 of 5)

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration offers some guidelines for proper food prep at home. First, “clean.” Wash hands and surfaces often and well. Bacteria can be found throughout a kitchen, including on utensils, cutting boards, sponges and countertops. Use warm water and soap for all washing of hands and cooking supplies. When cutting boards develop worn and hard to clean surfaces, they should be replaced. A loved one may consider paper towels just extra waste, but they are very good at preventing bacteria buildup.

Next, “separate.” Cross-contamination is how bacteria is spread, especially when handling raw meat, poultry and seafood.  Separate these foods from other foods in a shopping cart and also in the refrigerator. Use different cutting boards for them as well. Wash utensils and other dishes after coming in contact with raw meat, poultry, seafood, eggs and unwashed fresh produce. A big
“no-no” is putting cooked food on the same plate the raw was on previously. Bacterial residue on the plate could contaminate the cooked food.

After separating, “cook” foods to proper temperatures. The FDA explains that foods are cooked safely when heated for a long enough time and at a high enough temperature to kill the harmful bacteria. There are many guidelines available for temperatures to watch for when cooking a variety of foods.

Finally, the FDA advises seniors to “chill,” and not in the way a teenager would mean! While stored at room temperature, bacteria in food may double every 20 minutes. Caregivers should teach a loved one to refrigerate foods quickly to keep bacteria at bay. Many people believe it’s not good to put hot food in a refrigerator, but the FDA says it keeps a person safe to do so.

With some simple guidelines, a caregiver can show their loved one how to eat safely at home and avoid problems down the road.

Eating Out

The McDonald’s trend hit the United States in the late 1950s, and has grown into a full-blown way of life since then. No longer is eating out a “treat” for a special occasion, such as a birthday, anniversary or first date. Sure, people may still dine at a fancier restaurant for those times, but grabbing a sandwich or salad is a regular habit.  Today, nearly 50 percent of the money spent on food goes toward meals that other people prepare.

 

  1 2 3 4 5



Printable Version Printable Version

 

 

Related Articles

The Long Distance Caregiver

Empty Refrigerators Could Equal Poor Health for Seniors

Carenote 09/18/08