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CARENOTES | Past Carenotes | Let's Talk

Carenotes

Welcome to CareNotes. In this special section we will feature a reader's letter and provide an opportunity for an interactive exchange that will help find some answers and possible solutions to concerns. If you wish to respond to this letter, simple follow the link provided at the end of the letter and add your comments and thoughts to our CareNotes Board.

This Week's Carenote - 03/20/12

What is the best way to communicate with someone living with mild to moderate dementia?
 
Dianne

 

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Name: Edith
Location: Illinois
Date: 04/12/2012
Time: 05:44 AM

Comments

I would suggest listening. Hard. Understanding that it is frightening to them and they need to be understood. Agree, "that must be confusing you' and remind them 'it will be okay', 'we are safe here' 'this must be hard on you' and most of all ' it will be okay'


Name: Brenda
Location: TN
Date: 03/21/2012
Time: 06:28 AM

Comments

"Alzheimer's from the Inside Out" by Richard Taylor is by a man with Alzheimer's and gives great insight into what it's like. A lot of folks have found it most helpful in dealing with people with dementia.


Name: Tea McALpin
Location: Temple, GA
Date: 03/21/2012
Time: 05:52 AM

Comments

By Skype! Many older adults love using Skype and the program is free. You can keep in touch and get face to face time as often as you like. You can also keep detailed records of progress and decline, which allows family members the ability to "step in" when the need arises.


Name: Sandy Eastman
Location: Montrose, CO
Date: 03/20/2012
Time: 08:04 AM

Comments

Dear Dianne, Your loved one has changed and you now need to accept the fact that this is the "new norm." Depending on the degree of dementia, they may have left reality and you will only frustrate yourself and your loved one by trying to bring them back into "the real world." Instead, go where they are, enter into their world. An example of this, my Mother thought she was my daughter. It was foreign to me to switch roles this way, but when I accepted it and played the role of being her Mom, we were better able to communicate and to laugh and enjoy one another. Time is precious so make as many memories as you can before she/he slips completely away.


Name: Gail
Location: Midwest
Date: 03/20/2012
Time: 05:09 AM

Comments

AT EYE LEVEL, CLEARLY, IN A PLEASANT TONE, WITH A SMILE. ALWAYS WAIT UNTIL THEY ARE FINISHED WITH THEIR WORDS TO RESPOND. GIVE THEM TIME. AND THE WORDS, "IT'S OKAY", SEEM TO HAVE SOME MAGIC. ONCE SOMEONE HEARS THAT "IT'S OKAY", MUCH OF THEIR CONCERN BECOMES OKAY.


Name: Kathy
Location: NH
Date: 03/20/2012
Time: 05:01 AM

Comments

Talk at their level,slowly and clearly and keep a sense of humor.



 







 

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