Caregiver.com

For About and By Caregivers


Subscribe to our bi-monthly publication Today's Caregiver magazine

  + Larger Font | - Smaller Font



ARTICLES / Incontinence / Dementia & Incontinence Treatment | Other Articles

Share This Article

Dementia and Incontinence Treatment

by Sandra Ray, Staff Writer

(Page 4 of 4)

The doctor may also recommend changes in diet, both fluid and foods, that can help treat incontinence. If bowel movements are not regular or consistent, then changing foods in the diet may make a significant improvement within a relatively short period of time. The patient may or may not resist such changes, especially if he or she has developed a resistance or affinity to particular foods due to dementia. It is important to discuss dietary changes with a physician or dietician so the patient is still eating balanced meals and snacks. Fluid intake should also be closely monitored.

Caregivers of dementia patients should understand that incontinence may be an inevitable part of the overall cognitive decline. As a person loses awareness of their surroundings, lifestyle, and loved ones, it is not surprising that loss of bodily functioning will also occur. It may be a tremendous source of frustration for both the caregiver and the patient. Communicating the incontinence issues early with the patientís healthcare team can help reduce some of the frustration that the household may have with the issue. Even though it can be an uncomfortable subject, it is important that the full needs of the patient be addressed. The sooner incontinence is addressed, the quicker the patient and the caregiver can begin to work with options that may reduce the frustration or embarrassment that is involved.

  1 2 3 4


Printable Version Printable Version

 

 

Related Articles

Urinary Incontinence Treatments for Women

Tips for Managing Incontinence with Frontotemporal Dementia

Embarrassed About Incontinence? Donít Be