Caregiver.com

For About and By Caregivers


Subscribe to our bi-monthly publication Today's Caregiver magazine

  + Larger Font | - Smaller Font



ARTICLES / General / Surviving Caregiving... / Other Articles

Share This Article

Surviving Caregiving with Dignity, Love and Kindness

By Barbara Hanson Dennis

(Page 2 of 4)

6. Exercise: This may sound like a nearly impossible thing to do if you are a 24/7 caregiver, but it is not. It is really on a par with being in a support group. Physical exercise is very important for anyone with dementia and their caregivers because it helps with depression, stress and overall health. There are several ways to do this. One possibility is to take your loved one with you as long as she or he can walk. Another option is to leave him/her doing some activity for the duration of your walk or other exercise. Finally, ask a family member, friend or agency person to stay while you exercise.

7. Planning: Time to plan ahead may vary with the extent to which the dementia has progressed when the diagnosis is given. Contact an Elder Care Attorney and have him or her help prepare all the Advance Directives one needs. This includes Power of Attorney, Living Will, Healthcare Power of Attorney and a regular Will. You may also want a Do Not Resuscitate (DNR) Form.

8. Meaningful Activities: While this may seem like an improbable recommendation for a person with dementia, it was definitely my experience that non-pharmacological activities were a key to a slower progression of the disease in my husband and others with dementia. Just as we are given suggestions for activities to “prevent” dementia, I strongly believe that activities can keep those already diagnosed from going downhill faster. It does not have to be huge. For Les, one year it was helping to propagate poinsettias over a year for the Christmas show at a Chicago conservatory and then taking people there to see them all. Other years, it was going to various nearby attractions with a caregiver willing to take him places to keep him seeing new things and active.

1 2 3 4



Printable Version Printable Version

 

 

Related Articles

What Every Alzheimer’s/Dementia Caregiver Must Know

Caregiving 101

Caregiving for a Parent or Elderly Person