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Senior Move Managers

By Jennifer Bradley, Staff Writer

(Page 4 of 4)

Tips

Tracy Smith, a relocation specialist at Movingcompanies.us offers these 10 tips for caregivers helping an elderly love one move.

  1. Plan ahead. It is essential to allow your loved one time to acclimate to the move. It will only add to stress for everyone if they are rushed.
  2. Be nice. Their point of view is completely different than yours. Let them still have control over the situation.
  3. Take pictures. Many times the person has lived in the home for a long time, and pictures will help them take memories with them to the new location.
  4. Plan a layout. Change is hard, especially for seniors. If they have a visual of how their old belongings may fit nicely in a new space, it can ease the transition.
  5. Hire movers. Caregivers may find it is emotionally and physically challenging to take on the entire packing/moving project them selves. There is help for you!
  6. Go slow. Remember, their minds and bodies are slower than they used to be.
  7. Communicate. They need to feel like it is their choice, and you are not taking over. Make sure you tell them what is happening during every step of the moving process.
  8. Give them tasks. Donít do it all for them. If even itís wrapping up items, or making small decisions, these tasks will keep your loved one busy and feeling important.
  9. Start small. Find a room or area with the least sentimental value, such as a bathroom, to begin packing. It goes faster and gives a sense of accomplishment to your loved one.
  10. Give them space. Listen when they want to revisit memories, even if it takes a while. Let them deal with the emotions of loss and change. Encourage your loved one, and let them know you care.

As a long-distance caregiver, moving a loved one can be a rollercoaster.  But, it doesnít have to be one that makes the riders nauseous. Moving and packing assistance is available, as are people willing to take the time to listen, and help seniors make this major transition with minimal stress for them and their caregiver.

 

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