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Reverse Mortgage FAQs

By Hilary Gibson, Staff Writer

(Page 1 of 4)  

How Much Money Can I Get?

The amount of funds you are eligible to receive depends on your age (or the age of the youngest spouse in the case of couples), the appraised home value, interest rates, and in the case of the government program, the lending limit in your area. In general, the older you are and the more valuable your home (and the less you owe on your home), the more money you can get.

Does My Home Qualify?

Eligible property types include single-family homes, 2-4 unit properties, manufactured homes (built after June 1976), condominiums, and townhouses. In general, cooperative housing is ineligible. However, some lenders have developed private programs that lend on co-ops in New York. 

What are My Payment Plan Options?

You can choose to receive the money from a reverse mortgage all at once as a lump sum, fixed monthly payments either for a set term or for as long as you live in the home, as a line of credit, or a combination of these. The most popular option chosen by more than 60 percent of borrowers is the line of credit, which allows you to draw on the loan proceeds at any time.

My Understanding is that the Unused Balance in the Line of Credit Option Has a Growth Feature. Does that Mean I'm Earning Interest?

No, you're not earning interest like you do with a savings account. The growth factor, which is equal to roughly the interest that you're being charged, takes into consideration that your home has appreciated in value over the past 12 months and that you are one year older.

How Can I Use the Proceeds from a Reverse Mortgage?

The proceeds from a reverse mortgage can be used for anything, whether its to supplement retirement income to cover daily living expenses, repair or modify your home (i.e., widening halls or installing a ramp), pay for health care, pay off existing debts, buy a new car or take a "dream" vacation, cover property taxes, and prevent foreclosure.

 

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